• New ARCH Research

    A new ARCH Lab paper entitled, “Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms in Canadian Emerging Adults” was recently published in the American Journal of Public Health. Findings from this population-based study showed three distinct trajectories of depressive symptoms that peak at 15-17 years of age and declined through to 25 years of age. Most emerging adults had […]

    Continue reading
  • New ARCH Research

    A new ARCH Lab paper entitled, “Major depressive disorder, suicidal behaviour, bipolar disorder, and generalised anxiety disorder among emerging adults with and without chronic health conditions” was recently published in Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences. Findings from this population-based study showed that lifetime prevalence of these mental disorders was significantly higher for individuals with chronic health […]

    Continue reading
  • New ARCH Research

    A new ARCH Lab paper entitled, “Mediated moderation of the relation between maternal and adolescent depressive symptoms: role of adolescent physical health” was recently published in Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology. Evidence suggested both a direct negative effect of maternal depression on symptoms of depression in adolescents, as well as an indirect effect whereby maternal […]

    Continue reading
  • ARCH Lab Contributes to Two Measurement Studies

    A paper by Van Lieshout et al. entitled, “Measurement invariance across parent and self-ratings of extremely low birth weight survivors and normal birth weight controls in childhood and adolescence on the Child Behavior Checklist and Youth Self Report” was recently published in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology. The study found that while the majority of […]

    Continue reading
  • New ARCH Research

    A new ARCH Lab paper entitled, “Association between trajectories of maternal depression and subsequent psychological functioning in youth with and without chronic physical illness” was recently published in Health Psychology. Four trajectories (low, decreasing, increasing, and high) of maternal depression were identified. The association of maternal depressive symptoms on youth psychological functioning (anger regulation, self-concept, […]

    Continue reading
  • ARCH Lab in the News

    ARCH Lab research was recently featured in the Neurology Advisor, who interviewed Dr. Ferro about the results from a recent paper, “Risk factors for health-related quality of life in children with epilepsy: a meta-analysis” in Epilepsia. In the interview, Dr. Ferro commented on the importance of family-centred care for children with epilepsy.

    Continue reading
  • New ARCH Research

    A new ARCH Lab paper entitled, “Trajectories of depressive symptoms during the transition to young adulthood: the role of chronic illness” was recently published in the Journal of Affective Disorders. Trajectories increased from early to mid-adolescence, decreased to early young adulthood, then increased again to late young adulthood. This study showed that youth with chronic […]

    Continue reading
  • New ARCH Research

    A new ARCH Lab paper entitled, “The impact of chronic physical illness, maternal depressive symptoms, family functioning, and self-esteem on symptoms of anxiety and depression in children” was recently published in the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. This study showed that chronic illness in children has a cascading effect resulting in elevated depressive symptoms in […]

    Continue reading
  • Hamilton Health Sciences funds two ARCH Lab projects on multimorbidity

    The ARCH Lab has received funding from Hamilton Health Sciences to conduct two important studies on the relationship between mental and physical health in children and youth. For more information about these studies, please visit our Projects page.

    Continue reading
  • Hamilton Health Sciences Early Career Award

    Dr. Mark Ferro, Director of the ARCH Lab, was awarded a Hamilton Health Sciences Research Early Career Award. This three-year renewable award will allow Dr. Ferro to dedicate a significant portion of his time to developing his research program and conducting studies that will contribute to important publications in the field.

    Continue reading